Sound Research WIKINDX

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Carpenter, E., & McLuhan, M. (1970). Acoustic space. In E. Carpenter & M. McLuhan (Eds), Explorations in Communication (pp. 65–70). London: Jonathan Cape.  
Added by: Mark Grimshaw-Aagaard 1/7/17, 11:56 AM
      "Auditory space has no favored focus. It's a sphere without fixed boundaries, space made by the thing itself, not space containing the thing."
      "[Auditory space] can be filled with sound that has no "object," such as the eye demands."
Casati, R., & Dokic, J. (2009). Some varieties of spatial hearing. In M. Nudds & C. O'Callaghan (Eds), Sounds & Perception (pp. 97–110). Oxford: Oxford University Press.  
Added by: Mark Grimshaw-Aagaard 2/1/14, 12:15 PM
      The Located Event Theory of Casati and Dokic: "sounds are located at their sources, and are identical with, or at least supervene on, the relevant physical processes in them"
      "[a] principle of classification of metaphysical theories of sounds can be based on the alleged location each theory assigns to sounds"
Dennett, D. C. (1978). Brainstorms: Philosophical essays on mind and psychology. Hassocks, Sussex: Harvester Press.  
Last edited by: Mark Grimshaw-Aagaard 9/11/18, 5:21 PM
      Talking of workers manipulating mechanical arms (viz. teleoperation): "They know perfectly well where they are and are not fooled into false beliefs by the experience, yet it is as if they were inside the isolation chamber they are peering into. With mental effort, they can manage to shift their point of view back and forth, rather like making a transparent Neckar cube or an Escher drawing change orientation before one's eyes. It does seem extravagent to suppose that in performing this bit of mental gymnastics, they are transporting themselves back and forth." (italics in original)
LaBelle, B. (2006). Background noise: Perspectives on sound art. New York: Continuum.  
Added by: Mark Grimshaw-Aagaard 3/9/14, 12:13 PM
      "sound is always in more than one place. If I make a sound, such as clapping my hands, we hear this sound here, between my palms at the moment of clapping, but also within the room, tucked up into the corners, and immediately reverberating back, to return to the source of the sound."
      "Xenakis's example is indispensable to any formulation of a history of sound art by forging a dynamic mix of musical and spatial elements. To appropriate and create architecture for renewed sense of listening, sound installation moves increasingly toward public space, situating the listener within a larger framework of sonic experience that is necessarily social, thereby leaving behind the singular object or space for an enlarged environmental potential."
Nudds, M. (2009). Sounds and space. In M. Nudds & C. O'Callaghan (Eds), Sounds & Perception (pp. 69–96). Oxford: Oxford University Press.  
Added by: Mark Grimshaw-Aagaard 2/1/14, 12:09 PM
      "[sound] is wholly instantiated wherever it is instantiated, including where we are"
O'Callaghan, C. (2009). Sounds and events. In M. Nudds & C. O'Callaghan (Eds), Sounds & Perception (pp. 26–49). Oxford: Oxford University Press.  
Last edited by: Mark Grimshaw-Aagaard 1/27/18, 2:51 PM
      "Sounds are stationary relative to their sources"
O'Shaughnessy, B. (2009). The location of a perceived sound. In M. Nudds & C. O'Callaghan (Eds), Sounds & Perception (pp. 111–125). Oxford: Oxford University Press.  
Added by: Mark Grimshaw-Aagaard 2/1/14, 12:14 PM
      sound moves through space because it is the transferal of physical force; there is an "essential spatio-temporal dynamism of sound"
WIKINDX 6.6.8 | Total resources: 1185 | Username: -- | Bibliography: WIKINDX Master Bibliography | Style: American Psychological Association (APA)