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Strawson, P. F. (1971). Individuals: An essay in descriptive metaphysics. London: Methuen. (Original work published 1959). 
Added by: Mark Grimshaw-Aagaard (1/8/24, 12:52 PM)   Last edited by: Mark Grimshaw-Aagaard (2/21/24, 9:38 AM)
Resource type: Book
Language: en: English
Peer reviewed
ID no. (ISBN etc.): 416 68310 X
BibTeX citation key: Strawson1959
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Categories: General
Keywords: Definition of sound, Space
Creators: Strawson
Publisher: Methuen (London)
Resources citing this (Bibliography: WIKINDX Master Bibliography)
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Quotes
p.65   Sounds "have no intrinsic spatial characteristics: such expressions as 'to the left of', 'spatially above', 'nearer', 'farther' have no intrinsically auditory significance. [In comparison with vision] the visual field is necessarily extended at any moment, and its parts must exhibit spatial relations to each other."   Added by: Mark Grimshaw-Aagaard
Keywords:   Definition of sound Space
pp.65–66   Suggesting that even the congentially blind have a concept of visual space (above, behind, and so on), Strawson contrasts this with hearing: "A purely auditory concept of space . . . is an impossibility."   Added by: Mark Grimshaw-Aagaard
Keywords:   Definition of sound Space
pp.72–73   "Coud there be reidentifiable sound-particulars in the purely auditory world?  . . . Could a being whose experience was purely auditory make sense of the distinction between himself and his states on the one hand, and something not himself or a state of himself, on the other? . . . these question are not independent. An affirmative answer to the second entails an affirmative answer to the first. For to have a conceptual scheme in which a distinction is made between oneself or one's states and auditory items which are not states of oneself, is to have a conceptual scheme in which the existence of auditory items is logically independent of the existence of one's states or of oneself. Thus it is to have a conceptual scheme in which it is logically possible that such items should exist whether or not they were being observed, and hence should continue to exist through an interval during which they were not being observed. So it seems that it must be the case that there could be reidentifiable particulars in a purely auditory world if the conditions of a non-solipsistic consciousness could be fulfilled for such a world. Now it might further be said that it makes no sense to say that there logically could be reidentifiable particulars in a purely auditory world, unless criteria for reidentification can be framed or devised in purely auditory terms. And if this is correct, as it seems to be, we have the conclusion that the conditions of a non-solipsistic consciousness can be satisfied in such a world only if we can describe in purely auditory terms criteria for reidentification of sound-particulars."   Added by: Mark Grimshaw-Aagaard
Keywords:   Definition of sound Presence Self Space
p.73   "the true solipsist is rather one who simply has no use for the distinction between himself and what is not himself."   Added by: Mark Grimshaw-Aagaard
Keywords:   Definition of sound Presence Space
Paraphrases
pp.74–81   Having shown that it is possible to conceive of a sound in a No-Space world, Strawson needs to deal with the idea of a sound unperceived by one person but perceived by another because the sound (and the other) is in a different place. Strawson admits that this particular of place cannot be contained within the particular of temporality, the particular of place must be stored somewhere with the sound and so he looks for an "analogy of space" that directly describes distance if not direction (the two components of an auditory spatial particular). One wonders why he just does not throw in the towel and admit immediately the impossibility of aspatial sounds (this, after all, is the aim of his thought experiment). He is also constrained by assuming the existence of only two dimensions within which particulars can be 'housed': time and space.   Added by: Mark Grimshaw-Aagaard
Keywords:   Definition of sound Space
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