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Schneider, E. F., Lang, A., Shin, M., & Bradley, S. D. (2004). Death with a story: How story impacts emotional, motivational, and physiological responses to first-person shooter video games. Human Communication Research, 30, 361–375. 
Added by: sirfragalot (03/05/2006 10:26:49 AM)   Last edited by: sirfragalot (06/03/2008 03:53:15 PM)
Resource type: Journal Article
BibTeX citation key: Schneider2004a
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Categories: General
Keywords: Immersion, Psychology, Violence
Creators: Bradley, Lang, Schneider, Shin
Collection: Human Communication Research
Views: 5/503
Abstract
"This study investigates how game playing experience changes when a story is added to a first-person shooter game. Dependent variables include identification, presence, emotional experiences and motivations. When a story was present, game players felt greater identification, sense of presence, and physiological arousal. The presence of story did not affect self-reported arousal or dominance. This study clearly demonstrates that story is something that video game players enjoy; it helps involve them in the game play, makes them feel more immersed in the virtual environment, and keeps them aroused. The greater character identification may be especially worrisome, as past research has shown that justified media violence disinhibits actual aggression on the part of its audience."
Added by: sirfragalot  Last edited by: sirfragalot
Notes
A number of hypotheses leading to the conclusion that "story matters" in producing positive responses from game players. Mentions in passing that greater sound fidelity helps create a sense of presence in the game -- better immersion in the game.
Added by: sirfragalot  Last edited by: sirfragalot
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