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Scruton, R. (2009). Sounds as secondary objects and pure events. In M. Nudds & C. O'Callaghan (Eds), Sounds & Perception (pp. 50–68). Oxford: Oxford University Press. 
Added by: sirfragalot (09/08/2013 12:24:06 PM)   
Resource type: Book Article
ID no. (ISBN etc.): 978-0-19-928296-8
BibTeX citation key: Scruton2009
View all bibliographic details
Categories: General, Typologies/Taxonomies
Keywords: Acousmatic sound, Definition of sound
Creators: Nudds, O'Callaghan, Scruton
Publisher: Oxford University Press (Oxford)
Collection: Sounds & Perception
Views: 3/383
Quotes
p.50   Sounds are "secondary objects and pure events"   Added by: sirfragalot
Keywords:   Definition of sound
p.57   "we do not attribute the secondary qualities of sounds to the bodies that emit them, nor to events that occur in those bodies"   Added by: sirfragalot
Keywords:   Definition of sound
p.58   A secondary object is "an object all of whose properties are ways in which it feels"   Added by: sirfragalot
Keywords:   Definition of sound
p.58   For Scruton, sounds are secondary objects because they are "a real part of the objective world" and not a mere "subjective impression"   Added by: sirfragalot
Keywords:   Definition of sound
p.58   "the 'acousmatic' experience of sound [where sounds are] emancipated from their causes"   Added by: sirfragalot
Keywords:   Acousmatic sound
p.61   With an Aristotelean conception of substance, an event is described by the objects taking part in it and the changes undergone by those objects as the event occurs. Thus, such a view of events is that they are "transformations undergone by particulars"   Added by: sirfragalot
Keywords:   Definition of sound
p.61   A pure event does not happen to any thing, it "cannot be reduced to changes undergone by reidentifiable particulars"   Added by: sirfragalot
Keywords:   Definition of sound
p.62   Our natural inclination to describe sounds in terms of their source "is not essential to the identification of the sound"   Added by: sirfragalot
Keywords:   Definition of sound
p.62   "The physicalist view banishes to the margin those features of sound that make sound so important to us, not only epistemologically, but also socially, morally, and aesthetically. In particular, it does not recognize the 'pure event' as a distinct ontological category, and one that introduces unique possibilities of communication."   Added by: sirfragalot
Keywords:   Definition of sound
p.63   Scruton uses examples and explanation of sound grouping/streaming (cf Bregman) to support his view of sounds as pure events because such auditory grouping needs no "bridges to the physical world" in the way that visual Gestalt figures do.   Added by: sirfragalot
Keywords:   Definition of sound Gestalt
pp.64-65   "pure events contain within themselves the principles whereby they can be ordered ... all without stepping into the order of things.   Added by: sirfragalot
Keywords:   Definition of sound Ontology
Paraphrases
pp.56-57   Secondary qualities are the way things feel -- not primary qualities that are physical and can be objectively measured. Secondary qualities allow us to discriminate between phenomena such as sounds.   Added by: sirfragalot
Keywords:   Definition of sound
p.58   Scruton supports his view that sounds are separate from the objects that emit them with examples such as radio and recording -- acousmatic sound. In such a case, sounds can be grouped (streamed) together coherently without reference to their physical origin.   Added by: sirfragalot
Keywords:   Definition of sound Acousmatic sound
p.64   To Scruton, sound's independence from the physical world leads to a coherence (grouping, streaming) that is a 'virtual causality'. It bears no relation to the process by which sounds are formed.   Added by: sirfragalot
Keywords:   Definition of sound Virtuality
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