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Patel, A. D., Iversen, J. R., Bregman, M. R., & Shulz, I. (2009). Studying synchronization to a musical beat in nonhuman animals. The Neurosciences and Music III—Disorders and Plasticity: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 459–469. 
Added by: sirfragalot (06/08/2014 05:36:19 PM)   
Resource type: Journal Article
Peer reviewed
DOI: 10.1111/j.1749-6632.2009.04581.x
BibTeX citation key: Patel2009
View all bibliographic details
Categories: General
Keywords: Animals and music
Creators: Bregman, Iversen, Patel, Shulz
Publisher: New York Academy of Sciences (New York)
Collection: The Neurosciences and Music III—Disorders and Plasticity: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Views: 5/242
Abstract
The recent discovery of spontaneous synchronization to music in a nonhuman animal (the sulphur-crested cockatoo Cacatua galerita eleonora) raises several questions. How does this behavior differ from nonmusical synchronization abilities in other species, such as synchronized frog calls or firefly flashes? What significance does the behavior have for debates over the evolution of human music? What kinds of animals can synchronize to musical rhythms, and what are the key methodological issues for research in this area? This paper addresses these questions and proposes some refinements to the "vocal learning and rhythmic synchronization hypothesis."
  
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